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FAQs

Questions about claiming

Have you got a question for a solicitor? Whether it is about your claim, your compensation, the claim process or even about going to court; we’ve likely answered it already in our Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) seen below. Our FAQs are constantly updated with new content added. However, if you are unable to find what you want to know, then we can only apologise to you in advance.

If you have not made a claim yet because you still have some questions to be answered first, then please do not hesitate to call us and speak to one of our claim advisors. By calling us you will receive a free initial consultation where our dedicated claim advisors can provide you with outstanding advice on claiming and can start you up with your claim.

Frequently asked questions

  1. Why should I claim for compensation?
  2. How much is my claim worth?
  3. How is my compensation calculated?
  4. What is a medical examination?
  5. What does issuing proceedings mean?
  6. What are court directions?
  7. What is a witness statement?
  8. How can I prepare for court?
  9. What happens at court?

1. Why should I claim for compensation?

You should claim for compensation even if the person who caused you the injury in an accident is someone you know personally. Compensation is not about financial gain but about recovering your financial losses. If you don’t claim for compensation, then you will be footing the bill for your treatment, the repair costs for your vehicle, suffering a loss of income and more.

Learn more about Why You Should Claim.

2. How much is my claim worth?

You can find the estimated claim values for most injuries on this website. As the seriousness of every injury is different, it is not uncommon for compensation awards to be less than or exceed the estimated values given on this website. The estimate values are based on the JSB guidelines used by personal injury solicitors in England.

Learn more about Your Injury Claim Worth.

3. How is my compensation calculated?

When you are making a claim, you are requesting to recover your financial losses. These losses are calculated as general damages and special damages. Your general damages are things that can be classed as priceless. Your special damages are things that have a set price, cost or fee.

Learn more about How Your Compensation Is Calculated.

4. What is a medical examination?

With most claims you will need a medical report. We will arrange for you to take an independent medical examination with a registered medical expert. During the medical, they will assess your injuries and may ask you questions about your accident and injuries. A medical report will be completed by them at the end of the assessment.

Learn more about your Medical Examination.

5. What does issuing proceedings mean?

If there is no progress to your case during the negotiation period with the third parties, then we may advise you to issue proceedings. This means letting the defendant know that you will be taking the case to court to be settled by a judge.

Learn more about Issuing Proceedings.

6. What are court directions?

Court directions are a timetable of dates and requests that the court feel necessary to conclude your case. Both the defendant and claimant will receive the court directions. The court directions must be completed in the allocated time in preparation for the court hearing. Failing to do so can lead to serious consequences ranging from paying some costs to the opponent to having your claim struck out of court.

Learn more about Court Directions.

7. What is a witness statement?

A witness statement is a document written by yourself to describe your version of the circumstances of the accident, how your injuries have affected your day to day life and any losses that you have incurred as a result of the accident. The statement needs to be written truthfully and honestly as it will be cross examined should your case reach court.

Learn more about your Witness Statement.

8. How can I prepare for court?

We cannot stress the importance of preparation before your attendance at court. The night before your final hearing, you will need to refresh your memory with the key documents that are essential to your case. You will need to dress smart and appropriately, and behave courteously and respectfully in the courtroom.

Learn more about Preparing For Court.

9. What happens at court?

We recommend arriving at least 45 minutes early so that you can have a pre-trial conference with your representative, the barrister to discuss any matters or questions of concern. When the hearing begins, you will be questioned by the defendant’s barrister on the documents, evidence and medical report that we have put together. Our barrister will in turn question the defendant along with any witnesses brought along. When the questioning is over, the judge will pass judgement and give their verdict on the case.

Learn more about the Court Process.

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