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Glossary Of Terms – L

Definitions

You will find below a list of definitions for legal terms and abbreviations found on this website beginning with ‘L’.

L
Laser dentistry

Laser dentistry is the use of lasers by dentists to enhance dental treatment. Laser dentistry treatment can be used to speed up the bleaching process associated with teeth whitening.

Laser resurfacing

Laser resurfacing is a form of laser skin treatment. A laser is applied to target and vaporise damaged skin. By creating injury to the old skin the body is forced to repair it by producing new, fresh skin.

Laser skin treatment

Laser resurfacing is a form of laser skin treatment. A laser is applied to target and vaporise damaged skin. By creating injury to the old skin the body is forced to repair it by producing new, fresh skin.

Laser tooth whitening

Laser tooth whitening involves using low intensity soft tissue dental lasers to speed up the bleaching process associated with teeth whitening.

Law

Law is a set of rules made by a legislator for people who are governed by it to follow.

Lawyer

A lawyer is someone who works in the legal industry. However, a fully qualified lawyer is recognised as either a barrister or a solicitor.

Leg injury

Your thigh, knee, shin and foot are all part of your leg. If you have injured any part of your leg in an accident, then you may be entitled to a claim for compensation.

Legal

Legal means it is in support of the law.

Legal 500

The Legal 500 is an organisation that assesses the strengths of individual law firms and ranks them based on a series of criteria to determine innovation, quality and excellence of service and business.

Legal costs

Legal costs is the money that a solicitor charges for their service. Your legal costs will also include any money spent by the solicitors on your behalf.

Legal proceedings

Legal action from one party against another for reasons such as prosecuting, protection or prevention.

Liability

Being legally responsible for something, such as the accident.

Limitation period

The limitation period is the maximum amount of time allowed to bring your claim to court after the happening of the accident.

Liposuction

Liposuction surgery is often carried out for cosmetic reasons. The operation involves sucking out excessive fat from the buttocks, hips, thighs and tummy.

Litigation

The process of taking an individual, company or organisation to court for legal proceedings.

Litigation in person

A litigant in person is an individual, company or organisation that is represented in court by themselves rather than a solicitor or barrister.

Loss of amenity

A claim for recovering damages that your injuries have prevented you from doing so, such as going to the gym, university, weddings, birthday parties and more.

Loss of hearing

Loss of hearing occurs naturally through aging, but can be caused by your line of work. Working in a field of constant and excessive noise can cause tinnitus and industrial deafness.

Loss of sight

If you are suffering from some form of unplanned sight loss due to an accident or surgery, then you should contact your doctor immediately to let them know of your situation.

Low velocity impact

Low velocity impact can be abbreviated to LVI. LVI is a term often used by the defendant's insurer to state that due to the low speed of the impact it is unlikely to have caused injury to the claimant.

Lung injury

Any injury to the lungs is a serious injury and should be reported to the doctor immediately. Inhalation of asbestos or carbon monoxide into the lungs will poison the body and can cause a fatality.

LVI

LVI stands for low velocity impact. LVI is a term often used by the defendant's insurer to state that due to the low speed of the impact, it is unlikely to have caused injury to the claimant.

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